As of this week, Apple’s requirements for apps to follow its AppTrackingTransparency are now in effect. These requirements went hand-in-hand with the iOS 14.5 launch, and impacts how an app can track users and access their advertising device IDs. In particular, consumer consent is now required if the app collects consumer information and shares it with others “for purposes of tracking across apps and web sites.” Apple has provided developers with specific implementation steps, which will be reviewed when apps are submitted to Apple for approval. As part of the submission, companies need to explain why they want to track users, as required under Apple’s guidelines.
Continue Reading Apple’s App Tracking Transparency Now In Effect

On March 15, 2021, the California Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) approved additional regulations to the CCPA. These regulations were originally proposed at the end of 2020 (which we covered here).  The changes are effective immediately. The modifications largely focus on (1) changes impacting those companies that “sell” information, and (2) the verification process for rights requests made by authorized agents.
Continue Reading Changes to CCPA Regulations are Approved and in Effect

Virginia is now the second state, after California, to pass a comprehensive privacy law. The Consumer Data Protection Act (“CDPA”) will come into effect January 1, 2023 (the same time as the modification to California’s Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), namely the California Privacy Rights Act). Although this new Virginia law has been compared by many to California’s current CCPA and the EU’s GDPR, there are some differences. Businesses will find most of the differences a relief, although the law does introduce a few new concepts.
Continue Reading Virginia is for…Privacy: Comprehensive Law Passed, Effective January 2023

The FTC recently settled with Flo Health, Inc., a popular fertility-tracking app, based on promises made about how health data would be shared.  In its complaint, the FTC alleged that while Flo promised to keep users’ health data private and only use it to provide the app’s services to users, in fact, health information of over 100 million users was being shared with popular third party companies. Namely, third parties who provided marketing and analytics services to the app.
Continue Reading FTC Settles with Fertility Tracking App For Alleged Deceptive Data Sharing Practices

One of the methods US and EU companies rely on most frequently for the transfer of personal data from the EU to the US are standard contractual clauses. For the method to be acceptable as a valid basis for transfer of personal information, one critical step is for companies to use the version of the clauses as approved by the EU Commission. This has causes some confusion and concern, as the clauses predate GDPR and thus do not include provisions related to that 2018 law. Another area of confusion has been the recent criticism of the clauses as a valid method -alone- for transferring personal data to certain jurisdictions, including the US. (See proposed supplemental protection measures proposed by the European Data Protection Board to address this latter issue, which we discussed recently.)
Continue Reading EU Seeking Comment on Revisions to Standard Contractual Clauses

Israel’s Privacy Protection Authority recently announced that Privacy Shield can no longer be relied on for data transfers between Israel and the United States. Israel did not have a direct Privacy Shield arrangement with the U.S., instead permitting the many Israeli companies that exchange data with their American counterparts to rely on a provision of its Privacy Protection Regulations that allows for transfers of data to any country that receives data from the EU under the same terms of such transfer.
Continue Reading Israel Follows Europe’s Lead on Privacy Shield

The FTC recently issued comments on how companies can use artificial intelligence tools without engaging in deceptive or unfair trade practices or running afoul of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The FTC pointed to enforcement it has brought in this area, and recommended that companies keep in mind four key principles when using AI tools. While much of their advice draws on requirements for those that are subject to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), there are lessons that may be useful for many.
Continue Reading FTC Provides Direction on AI Technology

As many who have been tracking CCPA are aware, the law requires training employees who handle consumer inquiries, and ensuring that employees understand how to help consumers exercise their rights. Since most of those rights requests are arriving by web page, email, and phone, it is unlikely that rights requests will slow in the face of COVID-19. Indeed, it is possible that they may increase. Employees will thus still need training, something many companies had anticipated doing in-person.

Coronavirus


Continue Reading Turn On the Camera Part Three: Fulfilling CCPA Training Obligations in the Face of COVID-19

NIST recently released a final version of its Privacy Framework to incorporate public feedback in response to the draft it issued late last year. For organizations familiar with the NIST Cybersecurity Framework first released in 2014, the privacy framework follows a similar structure and it is intended to be used together.
Continue Reading Final Draft of NIST Privacy Framework Released

As we get settled into the reality of living with both CCPA and GDPR, companies are looking for new approaches for keeping their privacy houses in order. CCPA reminds us that there is no end to new legislation: proposals are already coming in from states as varied as Nebraska, New Hampshire and Virginia. Similar legislative trends exist around the globe. How can companies be prepared to address this ever shifting legislative landscape? There are a few essential steps privacy officers can take, including (1) aligning the privacy team’s efforts with the underlying corporate mission, (2) having a clear understanding of both the company’s data and its use practices, and (3) having infrastructure in place that will allow for updates to notices and rights.
Continue Reading Getting Prepared for a Decade of Privacy

One of the amendments we’ve been watching over the past months is one that impacts rights of employees —both the company’s and other company’s employees. Under AB25, which passed the California Senate and is now awaiting governor signature, companies will be (for a year) exempted from providing current and former employees, job applicants, and contractors with the full suite of CCPA rights. Starting January 2020, however, these individuals must be provided with notice of information use. Access and deletion rights will not go into effect until January 2021.
Continue Reading What To Do About Employees Under CCPA: An Update