With the Kentucky governor recently signing into law that state’s privacy law the US now has 16 states with “comprehensive” privacy laws. This newest one will go into effect on January 1, 2026 – the same day as Indiana. It closely resembles other state privacy laws, in particular, Virginia’s privacy law. For a recap of all of the US state privacy laws and their obligations you can visit our interactive tool.Continue Reading Kentucky’s New Consumer Privacy Law: Is the Privacy Grass Greener in the Bluegrass State?

Continuing its focus on potential dark patterns, the FTC has reached a settlement with the lead generation company Response Tree LLC and its president over allegations that the company ran sites that tricked people into opting into receiving marketing calls. The FTC brought the case arguing that the company had violated both Section V of the FTC Act as well as the Telemarketing Sales Rule (or TSR, which implements TCFAPA).Continue Reading FTC Reaches $7 Million Settlement Over Response Tree’s “Consent Farm” Sites

The European Council recently approved a final version of the EU Data Act. The Act applies to manufacturers of connected devices. Among other things, it gives consumers certain rights about the information those devices collect. The Act is viewed as part of an overall data strategy by the EU, and complements both GDPR and the Data Governance Act.Continue Reading Connected Devices: Eyes on EU Data Act

The FTC recently announced a settlement with Global Tel*Link, a telecommunications company that contracts with prisons and jails to provide communication services to incarcerated individuals and their families. Those who use their services create accounts with the company and are required to provide not only usernames and passwords but also Social Security numbers and government ID numbers. The company also collects financial account information as well as names and addresses. The company included in its marketing materials promises about security, including that it was the “cornerstone of what we do.” The company also made promises about its security in RFPs to prisons and jails.Continue Reading FTC Decision with Global Tel*Link Signals Expectations for Use of Testing Environments

Biden’s sweeping AI Executive Order sought to have artificial intelligence used in accordance with eight underlying principles. The order, while directed to government agencies, will impact businesses as well. In particular, the order has privacy and cybersecurity impacts on companies’ use of artificial intelligence. Among other things, companies should keep in mind the following:Continue Reading What Is the Privacy Impact of the White House AI Order for Businesses?

The FTC’s second attempt to pursue the data broker, Kochava, continues to move forward. The amended complaint, which was just unsealed and thus available for the public to review, gives insight into the agency’s perspective on the harm that results when companies create profiles with sensitive information, and use that information to target ads to individuals. The amended complaint provides more detail about Kochava’s alleged practices; allegations the company strongly disagreed with. (Thus, why it sought -unsuccessfully- to have it sealed.)Continue Reading Amended Kochava Complaint Gives Insight into FTC’s View of Harm from Data Profiles

Among the various requirements under US state comprehensive privacy laws, those that relate to loyalty programs may be some of the most confusing. Only three states — California, Colorado and Florida — regulate these programs. How they do this varies, and the level of detail contained in the laws also varies. In California and Florida, the laws’ impact on loyalty programs is in how they define “financial incentives.” These are times when a company “pays” a consumer for their personal information. This might occur with a straight cash payment. More common though, is optimized pricing or providing a higher quality of services in exchange for getting personal information. For those who offer loyalty programs, depending on how they are operated, they may viewed as be financial incentives under these laws. Colorado’s comprehensive privacy law, on the other hand, imposes obligations on companies that operate “bona fide loyalty programs.” These are defined as programs where information is processed solely to provide the program’s benefits. Benefits must be -like in California- better pricing or quality of services.Continue Reading The Comprehensive Privacy Law Deluge: Impact on Loyalty Programs

It’s been a busy summer for US state privacy laws, and companies now need to keep track of a growing list of requirements from these laws. These include many we have written about in the past, including notice, vendor contract provisions, and offering consumers rights and choices. The laws also impose certain record keeping requirements, which we discuss here.Continue Reading The Comprehensive Privacy Law Deluge: Record-Keeping and Related Requirements

X Corp., the company formerly known as Twitter, recently sued Bright Data over its site scraping activities. Bright Data is a data collection company and advertises—among other services—its “website scraping” solutions. Scraping is not new, nor are lawsuits attempting to stop the activity. We may, though, see a rise in these suits with the rise in companies using them in conjunction with generative AI tools.Continue Reading Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel: X Corp. Sues Bright Data Over Site Scraping

As many who are keeping track of generative AI developments are aware, the FTC recently announced that it is investigating OpenAI’s ChatGPT product. For the privacy practitioner this investigation is important given that among other things, the agency wants to understand better how OpenAI is using personal information, and if its privacy representations are sufficient.Continue Reading OpenAI – FTC OpensAnInvestigation