The talk of “opt-out preference signals” or global privacy controls (GPC) has been increasing as companies dig into the forthcoming requirements under US “comprehensive” privacy laws. What is an opt-out preference signal? An “opt-out preference signal” also known colloquially as ”GPC,” is a signal sent by a platform or technology on behalf of a consumer that communicates the consumer’s choice to opt out of sale or sharing. Below, we summarize how each of the states treats this requirement.

Continue Reading Comparing and Contrasting the Opt Out Preference Signal Across States

With 2023 quickly approaching, many are spending this final quarter preparing for the five US state “comprehensive” privacy laws. Some of these contemplate clarifying regulations with technical and operational requirements. Requirements that will impact preparation activities.

Continue Reading State Comprehensive Privacy Laws: Status of the Regulations

One of the amendments we’ve been watching over the past months is one that impacts rights of employees —both the company’s and other company’s employees. Under AB25, which passed the California Senate and is now awaiting governor signature, companies will be (for a year) exempted from providing current and former employees, job applicants, and contractors with the full suite of CCPA rights. Starting January 2020, however, these individuals must be provided with notice of information use. Access and deletion rights will not go into effect until January 2021.
Continue Reading What To Do About Employees Under CCPA: An Update

California legislators have passed many bills to amend the California Consumer Protection Act since the law was passed. Last week there was significant developments in the status of those bills, as we reported. In addition to dropping the concept of a private right of action for non-breach matters, there are other key things to keep in mind. Some are good news for corporations, but some pending bills that would have helped clarify the law are not moving forward. On the pro-business side, employers and businesses that focus on handling employee data will be happy to learn of the revised definition to consumers. On the pro-consumer side, however, a bill was withdrawn that would have allowed the sharing of unique consumer identifiers for marketing purposes without being considered a “sale,” drawing a chorus of “shucks” from businesses alike. Keep reading for the details.
Continue Reading Like a Butterfly, Will the CCPA Continue to Evolve?