With six months before the first of the new US state general privacy laws go into effect, there are several steps companies can take now to begin to prepare. Unfortunately there are some parts of compliance that will be impacted by regulations that have either not been drafted, or if drafted, remain unfinalized. What, then, can companies do now? Familiarizing themselves with the types of requirements and beginning to address and develop mechanics for those requirements is a good start. Fortunately for most, these will not be new, as they are conceptually covered by CCPA, GDPR, or both.

Continue Reading Preparing for US State Privacy Law Compliance: The Six Month Mark

In this third post of our ongoing series, we examine key takeaways for companies in light of the recently released draft CPRA regulations. Today’s focus is on contractual requirements. (Visit here for information about collection and notice under the draft regulations, and here for information about choice.)

Continue Reading What Should We Do About the Draft CPRA Regulations?: Contracts

The California AG recently issued an opinion interpreting the scope of information that should be provided to consumers in an access request. In responding to access requests, companies must provide a list of all personal information that it has about that consumer. The AG opinion clarifies that inferences a company draws from personal information should be included in such a response.
Continue Reading In First CCPA “Opinion”, California AG Clarifies Scope of Access Requests

California recently updated both its data security and breach notice laws to include genetic data. With the passage of AB 825, the data security law now includes in the definition of “personal information” genetic data. The information needs to be “reasonably protected.” While many other states have similar “reasonable protection” requirements in their data security laws, California is one of a handful to specifically list genetic information.

Continue Reading California Broadens Security and Breach Laws, Includes Genetic Data

California’s governor recently signed SB 41 into law. The bill enacts the Genetic Information Privacy Act (GIPA). The governor rejected a similar bill last year over concerns about COVID-19 public health efforts. To address that concern, this bill exempts tests used to diagnose whether an individual has a specific disease.

Continue Reading California Enacts New Privacy Law for Genetic Data

On March 15, 2021, the California Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) approved additional regulations to the CCPA. These regulations were originally proposed at the end of 2020 (which we covered here).  The changes are effective immediately. The modifications largely focus on (1) changes impacting those companies that “sell” information, and (2) the verification process for rights requests made by authorized agents.
Continue Reading Changes to CCPA Regulations are Approved and in Effect

By ballot initiative, California residents recently approved Proposition 24, or the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), with approximately 56 percent voting in favor. CPRA significantly amends the CCPA by expanding individual rights, introducing new GDPR-style governance measures, and establishing a new enforcement agency (among other things). Importantly, CPRA does not replace or repeal CCPA, but rather augments it.  Further, no new private right of action will be added by CPRA.  The substantive provisions of CPRA do not take effect until January 1, 2023.
Continue Reading The CCPA Wheels Keep Turning: The Addition of CPRA