Google Play’s “data safety form” is now live. Developers can now submit the form for early review and feedback. Starting in April 2022, Google will require this label and a privacy policy for all new and existing apps. This is similar to Apple. Before, only apps that collected personal and sensitive user data needed to share a privacy policy in Google’s store.

Continue Reading Google’s Privacy “Data Safety” Form Is Now Available

Apple has issued new guidelines for apps that let people create accounts. The guidelines will require these apps to give people a way to delete their accounts. This requirement is broader than CCPA and GDPR deletion rights, as it applies to all users (not just those from specific territories). The requirements go into effect for submissions starting January 31, 2022.

Continue Reading Apple To Require Ability to Delete Accounts In-App

New York City recently amended its law governing third party delivery services, with the changes going into effect December 27, 2021. The revised law specifically permits restaurants to ask for customers’ personal information from the delivery service. The delivery service, in turn, must tell consumers about the potential sharing “in a conspicuous manner” on its website and give people the ability to opt-out of such sharing.  That notice needs to indicate that the person’s information will be shared with the restaurant, and needs to identify the restaurant.

Continue Reading Impact of NYC’s New Delivery Service Data Sharing Requirement

As discussed in our sister blog, CARU’s revised Ad Guidelines go into effect on January 1, 2022. While the core principles of the guidelines have not changed, they now include new content to account for today’s advertising environment. Several modifications are important to keep in mind for those who collect information from children.

Continue Reading The Impact of the CARU Advertising Guidelines Change On Privacy

Google recently announced that beginning next year it will require Android mobile apps to provide privacy disclosures. These disclosures will live in a new “safety section” in Google Play. The requirements include disclosing:

  • What information the app collects and how information is used;
  • How the app protects information and if it uses encryption;
  • If information is shared and if users have a choice about sharing;
  • If users can request data deletion; and
  • If the disclosures made in the safety section have been verified by an independent third party.


Continue Reading Time to Update Your Privacy Disclosure Creation Checklists? Google Will Add to Mobile Privacy Disclosure Requirements

As of this week, Apple’s requirements for apps to follow its AppTrackingTransparency are now in effect. These requirements went hand-in-hand with the iOS 14.5 launch, and impacts how an app can track users and access their advertising device IDs. In particular, consumer consent is now required if the app collects consumer information and shares it with others “for purposes of tracking across apps and web sites.” Apple has provided developers with specific implementation steps, which will be reviewed when apps are submitted to Apple for approval. As part of the submission, companies need to explain why they want to track users, as required under Apple’s guidelines.
Continue Reading Apple’s App Tracking Transparency Now In Effect

As it closed out 2020, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) sent out requests to nine social media and video streaming companies asking them to provide more information about how they treat consumer information. The FTC indicated that it wanted to learn more about the companies’ activities in order to inform the FTC’s approach to privacy and data security. The FTC, in particular, is focused on how the privacy practices of these entities affect children and teenagers. The FTC exercised its authority under a provision of the law that allows it to gather information generally from a particular company or industry (without bringing a specific action against the company or industry). One FTC commissioner did dissent, arguing that the request the FTC made of these companies was too broad.
Continue Reading FTC Focuses on Privacy Practices of Social Media and Video Streaming Companies

Apple has launched, in connection with other privacy changes in iOS 14, a requirement for privacy “nutrition labels.” The labels are required for new and existing apps, and are in addition to the existing requirement of linking to the company’s long-form privacy policy. Apple will automatically generate the label based on the company’s answers to its online questionnaire. Apple is requiring companies to explain what information they -and third-party partners collect. Answers will be turned into visuals for the label (a circle “i” for example, for contact information). Companies can also include optional disclosures, like confirming that data is not being used for tracking or third-party advertising purposes (if that is accurate).
Continue Reading Apple Privacy Nutrition Labels Effective Starting Next Month

The California Attorney General recently released a third set of proposed modifications to the CCPA regulations. As we previously covered, the CCPA regulations were approved and went into effect on August 14, 2020. Many companies will likely be frustrated by the fact that new changes have been proposed again, just two months after the final version was approved. Companies have until October 28, 2020 to submit comments to the AG on the modifications.
Continue Reading Will CCPA Regulation Change Again?: Comment Deadline Looming

As we wrote previously, kids are spending more of their days online and are using online platforms for virtual learning and entertainment. Much of this environment is funded through online advertising. All companies thus need to think about the impact that children’s privacy laws, like COPPA, have on the online environment, as they will see the outcomes of this applicability in their contracts.
Continue Reading Back to School Special: But I’m Just an Ad Network! Am I Subject to Children’s Privacy Laws?

In our online world, one of the challenges (and opportunities) for companies is the increased use of their websites, apps, and connected devices. For platforms directed to both adults and children, or platforms previously directed to adults which would like to now also direct their services to children, the FTC’s recently streamlined FAQs, and ICPEN’s guide (both of which we introduced earlier this week) can help companies in this space. The information is particularly helpful for those that were aimed mostly toward adults, and are now shifting their business plans to direct products or services to children as well.
Continue Reading Back to School Special: Is My Multi-Age Platform Subject to Child Protection Requirements?