The NJ attorney general recently announced that it settled with a Chinese entity over violations of COPPA. The company promotes itself as a “virtual beauty counter,” and makes a variety of apps that let consumers virtually try on makeup. These apps include facial recognition technology, as well as photo-editing tools that allow users to customize and touch up their photos (the apps include Beauty Plus, AirBrush, and Meitu). The apps, according to the AG, allowed children under 13 to submit personal information without first getting parental consent, in violation of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.
Continue Reading NJ AG Settles with Chinese Firm Over COPPA Violations, FTC Sends Warning Letters

The settlement between VTech Electronics Ltd. and the FTC in the first Internet-connected toys COPPA case is a reminder for companies looking to enter the connected toys space not to forget this child-focused law.

The FTC complaint alleged that VTech violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act and the FTC’s COPPA Rule because it collected personal information from children without parental consent. According to the FTC, VTech markets and sells various “electronic learning products,” which it targets to 3- to 9-year-olds. Those products have an area similar to an app store, and one of the apps available is called Kid Connect. Kid Connect, the FTC explained, lets children communicate with other users. Although parents did have to sign children up for the interactive features of the VTech products, the FTC had concerns about the compliance of the consent process. Namely, that VTech did not have a way to verify that the person submitting consent was the parent, not the child him or herself. Also of concern for the FTC, and in violation it alleged of COPPA, was not having a link to the privacy policy in all areas of Kid Connect where personal information was collected. And in some instances, like the Kid Connect registration page, the privacy policy link was not sufficiently prominent. Additionally, some of the information required by COPPA to be included in a privacy policy was missing. This included VTech’s address and email address, a full description of what information was being collected from children, and the parent’s right to review/delete children’s personal information.
Continue Reading Connected Toys, COPPA, and What’s Next

France’s data protection commissioner joins others in taking action against toymaker Genesis Toys related to its popular internet-connected toys My Friend Cayla and i-Que Robot. Last December, a number of consumer groups filed complaints with regulators in the U.S. and Europe raising privacy and security concerns about the toys. The groups asserted that the toys fail to meet U.S. and E.U. privacy and data protection standards because the toys record and collect the conversations of children without parental consent and without limitations on the collection, use, or disclosure of the information, and because the toys can be easily hacked by third parties.
Continue Reading France Joins Others, Enforces Against Connected Toys