In addition to recently passing a cybersecurity safe harbor law, Connecticut also updated its data breach notification law. Connecticut joins Texas in passing changes to breach notification requirements this year. There are three key changes included in this amendment.

Continue Reading Connecticut Expands Data Breach Notification Law, Changes Effective October 1, 2021

Connecticut recently enacted cybersecurity legislation that provides a safe harbor for businesses that implement a written cybersecurity program. Under the legislation, set to go in effect on October 1, 2021, punitive damages will not be assessed on a business that has suffered a data breach, in the event that there are causes of action alleging a failure to implement reasonable cybersecurity controls, which failure resulted in the breach.

Continue Reading Connecticut Enacts New Cybersecurity Safe Harbor

The Georgia Supreme Court recently concluded that Georgia’s equivalent of the CFAA should be viewed narrowly, similar to the US Supreme Court’s recent, similar decision in Van Buren. In Kinslow v. State, the Georgia Supreme Court held that even if there is unauthorized use of a computer or computer network, there must be enough evidence to prove that the defendant used the computer network knowingly without authority and with the intention of obstructing or interfering with the use of data.

Continue Reading New Decision Narrows Scope of Georgia Computer Trespass Statute

Texas’s data breach notification law was recently amended to require the state’s Attorney General to post notice of data breaches on a public website within 30 days of receiving notice of the data breach. It also requires companies to provide the AG with more information when notifying the AG of a breach.

Continue Reading Texas Breach Notification Law Amended, Changes Effective September 1, 2021

MoviePass, a movie subscription service, has agreed to a proposed settlement with the FTC over alleged deception and lack of security allegations. The now-defunct company not only allegedly marketed its service as a “one movie per day” service – yet took steps to actively deny subscribers such access – it also failed, according to the FTC, to secure subscriber’s personal data. The company also was alleged to have violated the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confident Act, which impacts the offering of “negative option” (subscription) services.
Continue Reading FTC Settles Security Claims With Both MoviePass and Its Owners

The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Van Buren addressed the meaning of the term “exceeds authorized access” under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). The Court held, in a criminal case that alleged that the person used information for an improper purpose, that the law’s definition of this term does not include situations when people have improper motives for obtaining computerized information they are otherwise authorized to access.
Continue Reading The Impact of the Narrowed Scope of CFAA Liability in the Privacy and Security Realm

The Dutch Data Protection Authority recently imposed a €475,000 fine ($558,000) against the hotel website Booking.com for waiting longer than 72 hours to report a data breach. According to the Dutch DPA press release, Booking.com learned of the breach on January 13, 2019 and reported it to the DPA on February 7, 2019. The DPA did not make it clear in that release whether Booking.com had, in fact, determined on January 13, 2019 that a security breach impacting personal information of Dutch citizens had occurred or whether January 13, 2019 was date that Booking.com was first alerted to suspicious activity.

Continue Reading Booking.com Fined By Dutch DPA For Breach Notice Delay

Utah recently amended its breach notice law to provide certain defenses to companies who suffer a data breach.  It is now the second state, after Ohio, to include such provisions. Specifically, entities that create and reasonably comply with a written cybersecurity program may have an affirmative defense to litigation resulting after a data breach. For the safe harbor to apply, the written cybersecurity program must:
Continue Reading Utah Creates Data Breach Safe Harbor

Will HHS’ approach for imposing penalties in the aftermath of a data breach become a little clearer in 2021? This is a distinct possibility in the wake of a Fifth Circuit decision vacating penalties against MD Anderson Cancer Center. The hospital suffered three data breaches, leading HHS to impose over $4 million in civil penalties. That fine was reversed recently by the Fifth Circuit as arbitrary, capricious, and contrary to law.
Continue Reading What Does the Fifth Circuit’s Vacating of HHS HIPAA Fines Mean for Companies This Year?

A class action lawsuit filed against PayPal in connection with a breach it suffered in 2017 was dismissed recently because the plaintiffs did not adequately allege PayPal’s intent to deceive investors.  The litigation began after PayPal’s acquired TIO Networks Corporation, a smaller payment processor and platform.  Post-acquisition, PayPal announced that it had discovered “security vulnerabilities” in TIO’s operations and it thus suspended TIO’s operations.  At that point, TIO had not yet been integrated into PayPal’s platform.  PayPal confirmed that it was investigating TIO’s security measures with the help of outside assistance, and that PayPal customers’ data remained secure.  PayPal further confirmed that it was not aware of any breach of personal information maintained by TIO.  The following month, however, PayPal announced that a breach of personal information had in fact occurred.  Confidential information belonging to 1.6 million customers had been potentially compromised, causing PayPal’s stock price to drop by 5.75%.
Continue Reading Successful Dismissal of PayPal Class Action Over Breach Disclosures Serves as Risks Reminder