With the Kentucky governor recently signing into law that state’s privacy law the US now has 16 states with “comprehensive” privacy laws. This newest one will go into effect on January 1, 2026 – the same day as Indiana. It closely resembles other state privacy laws, in particular, Virginia’s privacy law. For a recap of all of the US state privacy laws and their obligations you can visit our interactive tool.Continue Reading Kentucky’s New Consumer Privacy Law: Is the Privacy Grass Greener in the Bluegrass State?

Continuing its focus on potential dark patterns, the FTC has reached a settlement with the lead generation company Response Tree LLC and its president over allegations that the company ran sites that tricked people into opting into receiving marketing calls. The FTC brought the case arguing that the company had violated both Section V of the FTC Act as well as the Telemarketing Sales Rule (or TSR, which implements TCFAPA).Continue Reading FTC Reaches $7 Million Settlement Over Response Tree’s “Consent Farm” Sites

The FTC recently announced a settlement with Global Tel*Link, a telecommunications company that contracts with prisons and jails to provide communication services to incarcerated individuals and their families. Those who use their services create accounts with the company and are required to provide not only usernames and passwords but also Social Security numbers and government ID numbers. The company also collects financial account information as well as names and addresses. The company included in its marketing materials promises about security, including that it was the “cornerstone of what we do.” The company also made promises about its security in RFPs to prisons and jails.Continue Reading FTC Decision with Global Tel*Link Signals Expectations for Use of Testing Environments

Biden’s sweeping AI Executive Order sought to have artificial intelligence used in accordance with eight underlying principles. The order, while directed to government agencies, will impact businesses as well. In particular, the order has privacy and cybersecurity impacts on companies’ use of artificial intelligence. Among other things, companies should keep in mind the following:Continue Reading What Is the Privacy Impact of the White House AI Order for Businesses?

It’s been a busy summer for US state privacy laws, and companies now need to keep track of a growing list of requirements from these laws. These include many we have written about in the past, including notice, vendor contract provisions, and offering consumers rights and choices. The laws also impose certain record keeping requirements, which we discuss here.Continue Reading The Comprehensive Privacy Law Deluge: Record-Keeping and Related Requirements

X Corp., the company formerly known as Twitter, recently sued Bright Data over its site scraping activities. Bright Data is a data collection company and advertises—among other services—its “website scraping” solutions. Scraping is not new, nor are lawsuits attempting to stop the activity. We may, though, see a rise in these suits with the rise in companies using them in conjunction with generative AI tools.Continue Reading Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel: X Corp. Sues Bright Data Over Site Scraping

Oregon recently joined Vermont and California as the third state requiring data broker registration before collecting, selling, or licensing “brokered personal data.” Several types of entities are exempt from the law. These include those collecting information from their customers, subscribers or users or those in a “similar” relationship or an entity acting as those companies’ agents. Also exempt are consumer reporting agencies, financial institutions, and affiliates or nonaffiliated third parties of financial institutions subject to GLBA. The new law takes effect on January 1, 2024.Continue Reading In 2024 Oregon Will Join Short List of States Requiring Data Broker Registration

The enforcement division of the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) recently announced it intends to review the privacy practices of connected vehicles. The driving force behind the review is the technologies in connected cars that raise privacy concerns. These include location sharing and smartphone integration. Connected cars often also have cameras and web-based entertainment systems. These cars—and the technologies in them—may monitor people both in the car and outside of it. For many Californians, the car is part of their daily routines. Connected vehicles can effectively becoming a constant data generator.Continue Reading California Regulator Drives Inquiry into Vehicle Data

In response to a constantly-evolving cyber threat landscape, the Biden Administration recently announced the launch of a new cybersecurity labeling program – the U.S. Cyber Trust Mark program – in an effort to enhance transparency and protection against cyber threats in the growing Internet of Things (“IoT”) device space.Continue Reading Cybersecurity Labeling Program to Increase Transparency of IoT Device Security

Oregon’s governor has now signed into law the state’s comprehensive privacy law. Meaning, there are now 12 states with these laws, six of which were passed just this year (others passed in 2023 were Iowa, Indiana, Tennessee, Montana, and Florida). Oregon’s law will go into effect on July 1, 2024, with limited parts not effective until January 1, 2026.Continue Reading State Comprehensive Privacy Laws – Beaver State Makes a Dozen