The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner issued a determination earlier this fall about 7-Eleven’s use of “faceprints.” The OAIC found the convenience store improperly collected faceprint information without getting individuals’ consent in violation of the Privacy Act.

Continue Reading Australia Objects to 7-Eleven’s In-Store Use of Facial Recognition Technology

The Federal Trade Commission recently issued a new enforcement policy statement about “dark patterns:” programs that attempt to “trap” consumers into service contracts. These programs usually take the form of negative option marketing programs, according to the FTC, and are regulated under most states’ laws as well as the Restore Online Shoppers Confidence Act (ROSCA).

Continue Reading FTC To Focus Enforcement Efforts on Dark Patterns

Apple has issued new guidelines for apps that let people create accounts. The guidelines will require these apps to give people a way to delete their accounts. This requirement is broader than CCPA and GDPR deletion rights, as it applies to all users (not just those from specific territories). The requirements go into effect for submissions starting January 31, 2022.

Continue Reading Apple To Require Ability to Delete Accounts In-App

Policymakers, regulators, and litigants are starting to bring privacy into antitrust matters. This is a move beyond the traditional focus on price restraints. Privacy are playing both offensive and defensive purposes, as we wrote recently.*

Continue Reading Privacy Playing Increased Role in Antitrust Enforcement

Colorado recently joined Virginia and California in passing a more comprehensive privacy law. The Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) will go into effect July 1, 2023. This is six months after Virginia’s law (CDPA) and California’s Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), which amends the existing CCPA, go into effect. The law does not have a private right of action, and the AG is to adopt regulations on certain aspects by July 1, 2023.

Continue Reading And Then There Were Three: Colorado Passes Privacy Law, Effective July 2023

MoviePass, a movie subscription service, has agreed to a proposed settlement with the FTC over alleged deception and lack of security allegations. The now-defunct company not only allegedly marketed its service as a “one movie per day” service – yet took steps to actively deny subscribers such access – it also failed, according to the FTC, to secure subscriber’s personal data. The company also was alleged to have violated the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confident Act, which impacts the offering of “negative option” (subscription) services.
Continue Reading FTC Settles Security Claims With Both MoviePass and Its Owners

New York City recently enacted a biometric ordinance that is set to come into effect July 9, 2021. With this ordinance, NYC joins other cities (like Portland) in regulating the use of biometric information. The ordinance may impact retailers, restaurants, and entertainment venues in the city that use security cameras with facial-recognition technology or otherwise collect biometric identifiers from their customers.
Continue Reading New York City Biometric Ordinance Effective July 9, Are You Ready?

Nevada’s governor recently approved an amendment to their privacy law. As we covered previously, generally, this law affords consumers a right to opt out of the “sale” of their data to third parties.  The amendment broadens (1) the scope of the law to also apply to “data brokers” and (2) consumers right to opt-out of sale. The changes are expected to go into effect October 1, 2021.
Continue Reading Nevada Broadens its Privacy Law

The Supreme Court recently dealt a potential blow to the FTC’s enforcement tool chest.  In particular, the decision impacts its ability to seek monetary relief under a theory it has used in a wide variety of cases, included privacy and security ones, that monetary relief constitutes a “permanent injunction” on consumers’ behalf. In AMG Capital Management, LLC v. Federal Trade Commission, the Supreme Court held that while the FTC should be able to obtain injunctive relief to stop unfair practices, that power does not extend to seeking monetary relief for injured consumers.
Continue Reading Supreme Court Decision Impacts How FTC May Pursue Privacy Cases

As of this week, Apple’s requirements for apps to follow its AppTrackingTransparency are now in effect. These requirements went hand-in-hand with the iOS 14.5 launch, and impacts how an app can track users and access their advertising device IDs. In particular, consumer consent is now required if the app collects consumer information and shares it with others “for purposes of tracking across apps and web sites.” Apple has provided developers with specific implementation steps, which will be reviewed when apps are submitted to Apple for approval. As part of the submission, companies need to explain why they want to track users, as required under Apple’s guidelines.
Continue Reading Apple’s App Tracking Transparency Now In Effect

The Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) has spawned hundreds of class action lawsuits and a raft of unresolved issues.  A core issue from a litigation perspective—as well as for companies bracing for potential lawsuits—is one of “standing,” and in particular, what BIPA claims can be brought by plaintiffs in what venues.

Continue Reading Beware BIPA Bifurcation: Plaintiffs’ New Gambit to Split BIPA Claims Between State and Federal Courts