The California Attorney General recently released a third set of proposed modifications to the CCPA regulations. As we previously covered, the CCPA regulations were approved and went into effect on August 14, 2020. Many companies will likely be frustrated by the fact that new changes have been proposed again, just two months after the final version was approved. Companies have until October 28, 2020 to submit comments to the AG on the modifications.
Continue Reading Will CCPA Regulation Change Again?: Comment Deadline Looming

In this remote era, companies are increasingly being approached by their business teams with ideas about products and services that involve video or audio recordings of their consumers. It may also involve letting people manipulate photos of themselves. Sometimes, those recordings and pictures are of children. Content that contain images or audio of individuals are considered personal information under many laws, including the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). What does this mean for companies? As we discussed in our previous blog post, COPPA requires obtaining parental consent if the personal information collected is being collected by the company online, and being collected from the child. The FTC’s recently streamlined FAQs help companies find and understand obligations if collecting photos or recordings from children. Namely, a reminder that this content is personal, and does require verifiable parental consent before being collected.
Continue Reading Back to School Special: Recordings, Photos, Kids, and Parental Consent

The National Institute of Standards and Technology has issued a set of draft principles for “explainable” artificial intelligence and is accepting comments until October 15, 2020. The authors of the draft principles outline four ways that those who develop AI systems can ensure that consumers understand the decisions reached by AI systems. The four principles are:
Continue Reading NIST Seeking Comments on Draft AI Principles

The California AG has now released the final CCPA regulations, as approved by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL).  The final draft (issued August 14, 2020) incorporates some relatively minor changes that the OAG submitted as part of its final rulemaking package, as summarized in its addendum to the final statement of reasons. In addition to generally “non-substantive” edits for consistency, etc. the OAG withdrew four sections (999.305(a)(5), 999.306(b)(2), 999.315(c), and 999.326(c)) from OAL review.
Continue Reading CCPA Regulations Finally Approved, Effective Immediately

On June 1, 2020, the California AG submitted the final text of the proposed CCPA regulations to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL). There were no changes to the final text from the last version released in March, which we previously summarized here.
Continue Reading Final Draft CCPA Regulations Submitted, Effective Date Unclear

During COVID-19, in certain areas of the law, we have seen significant flexibility from regulators and government agencies in how they are addressing typical approval processes and/or compliance requirements. In the context of privacy and cybersecurity regulations, largely, regulators are emphasizing that personal privacy and data security are important now more than ever. New information is being collected and used in new ways. Certain data security vulnerabilities may be more prevalent in this work-from-home environment.
Continue Reading Privacy and Data Protection Enactment and Enforcement Timelines During COVID-19

On March 11, 2020, the second set of modifications (or the third version) of the CCPA draft regulations were released. While the number of substantive changes dwindled in this version, there are a number of drafting corrections and a few modifications of note. Namely:
Continue Reading Can you Zigzag? California AG Releases Latest Draft of CCPA Regulations

As companies brace for the impact of COVID-19, the last thing on everyone’s mind may be proactive privacy compliance obligations. Certainly, companies may be thinking about privacy obligations that relate specifically to their COVID-19 response. What types of employee information can be disclosed, for example, especially in European offices? (On this, see guidance from the French, Italian and Irish data protection authorities.) But companies can think more broadly, in particular about how they will continue the proactive operations of the privacy team during this time. Some questions companies can ask themselves now include:
Continue Reading Turn on the Camera Part One: Keeping Your Privacy Compliant Efforts Moving Forward in the Face of COVID-19

NIST recently released a final version of its Privacy Framework to incorporate public feedback in response to the draft it issued late last year. For organizations familiar with the NIST Cybersecurity Framework first released in 2014, the privacy framework follows a similar structure and it is intended to be used together.
Continue Reading Final Draft of NIST Privacy Framework Released

As we get settled into the reality of living with both CCPA and GDPR, companies are looking for new approaches for keeping their privacy houses in order. CCPA reminds us that there is no end to new legislation: proposals are already coming in from states as varied as Nebraska, New Hampshire and Virginia. Similar legislative trends exist around the globe. How can companies be prepared to address this ever shifting legislative landscape? There are a few essential steps privacy officers can take, including (1) aligning the privacy team’s efforts with the underlying corporate mission, (2) having a clear understanding of both the company’s data and its use practices, and (3) having infrastructure in place that will allow for updates to notices and rights.
Continue Reading Getting Prepared for a Decade of Privacy

Many organizations are currently focused on updating their privacy policy to include content required by CCPA. While making those edits, now is a good time to take a step back and think more broadly about privacy program and operations generally, and in particular about the non-CCPA parts of your privacy policy.
Continue Reading Is Your Privacy Policy Ready for 2020?