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Kari M. Rollins is a partner in the Intellectual Property Practice Group and Office Managing Partner of the New York office.

An Illinois state appellate court’s recent ruling will impact how companies consider compliance with Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). That court ruled companies must have a BIPA-compliant written retention-and-destruction policy in place before collecting and possessing biometric data. The decision makes clear that mere possession of biometric data triggers the duty to develop the necessary written BIPA policy. In relevant part, under BIPA’s section 15(a), companies must establish a written, publicly-available policy that governs their retention and destruction of biometric data.

Continue Reading Illinois Appellate Court Weighs in on Biometric Data Policies

New York’s Attorney General Letitia James recently secured a $1.9 million settlement from online retailer Zoetop Business Company, Ltd. to settle allegations that Zoetop had improperly handled a 2018 data breach and subsequent consumer notification. The scrutiny given to Zoetop provides insights into the NYAG’s expectations around breach investigations and response.

Continue Reading Lessons From New York AG Scrutiny of Breach Investigation and Response

The FTC recently took action against the online alcohol marketplace company Drizly and its CEO for alleged security failures. The case arose from a 2018 data breach which was caused – according to the FTC – by poor security measures stemming from the company’s alleged failure to devote sufficient resources or attention to data security.

Continue Reading FTC Action Against Drizly and CEO Provides Insight Into Its Security Expectations

Beginning January 1, 2023, New York City will restrict employers from using artificial intelligence to make employment decisions unless they follow certain guidelines. The local law applies to employment decisions made “within the city” regarding job applicants and promotion decisions.

Continue Reading New York City Set To Regulate Employment Decisions Made By AI

The New York Attorney General recently announced a data security-related settlement with Wegmans Food Markets. The issue arose in April 2021 regarding a cloud-based incident. At that time a security researcher notified Wegmans that the company had an Azure cloud storage container that was unsecured. Upon investigation, the company determined that the container had been misconfigured and that three million customer records had been publicly accessible since 2018. The records included email addresses and account passwords.

Continue Reading Wegmans Settles With NYAG for $400,000 Over Data Incident

In a recent letter to the UK law society, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office and the National Cyber Security Centre have provided lawyers with advice about ransomware payments. The two agencies cautioned lawyers that such payments would not help “protect” the data, mitigate the risk to individuals, or result in a lower ICO penalty in the event of a regulatory investigation. Instead, they stated in a release that accompanied the letter, lawyers “should not advise clients to pay ransomware demands should they fall victim to a cyber-attack.”

Continue Reading UK ICO and NCSC Issue Caution About Making Ransomware Payments

Maryland recently passed two companion bills amending the state’s Personal Information Protection Act. The bills modify the data breach notification requirements and scope of businesses subject to the data security requirements. The key changes are summarized below, and will go into effect October 1 of this year:

Continue Reading Maryland Amends Data Security and Breach Notice Obligations

The SEC’s enforcement action with a leading seller of market data (App Annie Inc.) signals its concern with misleading data use representations. While the data at issue was not “personally identifiable” information, but instead corporate confidential information, the SEC’s concerns mirrored those that we have previously seen from that agency, as well as others, regarding representations made about personal information.

Continue Reading Implications of SEC’s Scrutiny of Data Use Representations

The SEC recently announced a settlement with Pearson plc where the company has agreed to pay $1 million to settle charges that it misled investors about a 2018 cyber incident. According to the order, Pearson made misleading statements and omissions about a 2018 data breach involving the theft of student data and administrator credentials in its July 2019 semi-annual report.

Continue Reading SEC Fine Highlights Importance of Cybersecurity Disclosures