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Kathryn (“Katie”) Smith is a Cybersecurity and Privacy Fellow in the firm's Chicago office and a member of the Privacy and Cybersecurity Team. She is certified by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) for CIPP/US.

Biden’s sweeping AI Executive Order sought to have artificial intelligence used in accordance with eight underlying principles. The order, while directed to government agencies, will impact businesses as well. In particular, the order has privacy and cybersecurity impacts on companies’ use of artificial intelligence. Among other things, companies should keep in mind the following:Continue Reading What Is the Privacy Impact of the White House AI Order for Businesses?

The FTC’s second attempt to pursue the data broker, Kochava, continues to move forward. The amended complaint, which was just unsealed and thus available for the public to review, gives insight into the agency’s perspective on the harm that results when companies create profiles with sensitive information, and use that information to target ads to individuals. The amended complaint provides more detail about Kochava’s alleged practices; allegations the company strongly disagreed with. (Thus, why it sought -unsuccessfully- to have it sealed.)Continue Reading Amended Kochava Complaint Gives Insight into FTC’s View of Harm from Data Profiles

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission approved data privacy regulations under the 2022 Massachusetts Sports Wagering Act earlier this fall. While directed to a narrow group of companies, the restrictions around use of artificial intelligence, profiling and breach notification suggest the types of concerns that we may see other regulators focus on in other industries.Continue Reading Massachusetts Wagers Big on Privacy in Sports Betting

Beginning today, the UK adequacy decision for US data protection measures goes into effect. As a result, UK companies can transfer personal information to entities in the US that are participants in the EU-US Data Privacy Framework (DPF). As part of the decision, the UK Secretary of State will review the ongoing sufficiency of the DPF every four years. The ICO, in supporting the decision, suggested that the UK Secretary of State look at specific factors when reassessing the program. These include the risk to UK data subjects for automated decision making and right to be forgotten.Continue Reading No Need to Mind the Gap – UK Extension is a Data Bridge for US-UK Data Transfers

Among the various requirements under US state comprehensive privacy laws, those that relate to loyalty programs may be some of the most confusing. Only three states — California, Colorado and Florida — regulate these programs. How they do this varies, and the level of detail contained in the laws also varies. In California and Florida, the laws’ impact on loyalty programs is in how they define “financial incentives.” These are times when a company “pays” a consumer for their personal information. This might occur with a straight cash payment. More common though, is optimized pricing or providing a higher quality of services in exchange for getting personal information. For those who offer loyalty programs, depending on how they are operated, they may viewed as be financial incentives under these laws. Colorado’s comprehensive privacy law, on the other hand, imposes obligations on companies that operate “bona fide loyalty programs.” These are defined as programs where information is processed solely to provide the program’s benefits. Benefits must be -like in California- better pricing or quality of services.Continue Reading The Comprehensive Privacy Law Deluge: Impact on Loyalty Programs

The SEC has now finalized its much anticipated rules for public companies’ cybersecurity disclosures. The final rules, published this month, require disclosure of certain cybersecurity incidents much sooner than under many other breach notification regimes. Additionally, the final rules require new periodic disclosures about a company’s processes to assess, identify, and manage material cybersecurity risks and about the roles of management and the board of directors in managing or overseeing those cybersecurity risks. These new requirements vary from the SEC’s prior (2018) guidance, and unlike in the past, are now codified under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Securities Act of 1933.Continue Reading SEC Gives Finality on Cybersecurity Disclosures for Public Companies

The CPPA, the California regulatory body charged with enforcing CCPA, has now issued draft regulations on risk assessments and cybersecurity audits. The draft was released ahead of a public board meeting to discuss those topics (among other things).Continue Reading What Do the CPPA’s Draft Regulations on Risk Assessments and Cybersecurity Audits Mean for Companies?

After some delay, Delaware’s governor has at last signed into law the thirteenth state comprehensive privacy law. This is the seventh law passed in 2023, joining Iowa, Indiana, Tennessee, Montana, Florida, and Oregon. The law takes effect on January 1, 2025. The bill was passed by Delaware’s congress at the end of June and was sent to the governor’s office for signature on June 30, 2023. He did not sign it, though, until this week.Continue Reading The “First State” Officially Becomes the Thirteenth State with a Comprehensive Data Privacy Law

It’s been a busy summer for US state privacy laws, and companies now need to keep track of a growing list of requirements from these laws. These include many we have written about in the past, including notice, vendor contract provisions, and offering consumers rights and choices. The laws also impose certain record keeping requirements, which we discuss here.Continue Reading The Comprehensive Privacy Law Deluge: Record-Keeping and Related Requirements

Texas has joined Arkansas and Utah as the third state to impose requirements on social media accounts for those under 18. Namely, with the Securing Children Online through Parental Empowerment Act (“SCOPE Act”), Texas will place requirements on “digital service providers.” The law goes into effect September 1, 2024. It does not provide for a private right of action. Instead, enforcement will be by the Texas attorney general.Continue Reading Texas’ SCOPE Act Puts Focus on Social Media and Minors