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Julia Kadish is an associate in the Intellectual Property Practice Group in the firm's Chicago office and is a member of the Privacy and Cybersecurity Team.

The FTC recently settled with Flo Health, Inc., a popular fertility-tracking app, based on promises made about how health data would be shared.  In its complaint, the FTC alleged that while Flo promised to keep users’ health data private and only use it to provide the app’s services to users, in fact, health information of over 100 million users was being shared with popular third party companies. Namely, third parties who provided marketing and analytics services to the app.
Continue Reading FTC Settles with Fertility Tracking App For Alleged Deceptive Data Sharing Practices

Many supervisory authorities across Europe have reported increasing numbers of data breach notifications since the introduction of GDPR. While most companies are now familiar with the 72-hour reporting obligation for controllers to supervisory authorities, whether such obligation has been triggered continues to present unique and complex questions in each specific security event. To help aid companies sorting through these potential legal notification obligations in the aftermath of a security event, the EDPB recently released draft guidance, which is open for comment until 2 March 2021.
Continue Reading Companies Have Until March to Comment on EDPB Data Breach Notification Guidelines

Many in the world have been watching the Brexit deal closely, including privacy lawyers and others who deal with global data transfers. Under the recently-announced deal, a temporary solution will allow companies to continue to transfer data between the UK and European Economic Area (EEA) as normal during a short post-Brexit transition period. As many know, transfers of personal data are restricted out of the EEA to third countries unless certain steps are taken or exceptions apply. One of those mechanisms being an EU determination that the country to which data is being transferred is “adequate.” With the current transition period set to expire December 31, 2020, and no adequacy decision for the UK issued yet from the Commission, companies have been worrying about how to receive data from the EEA into the UK given its impending status as a “third country.”
Continue Reading New Year, Same Transfers (for now): Temporary Brexit Deal Keeps EEA-UK Data Flowing

As 2020 draws to a close and we approach CCPA’s first birthday, the regulations continue to remain very much in “infant” mode. On December 10, 2020, the California Attorney General released a fourth set of proposed regulations. This is the second set of proposed changes released since the regulations went into effect in August 2020. Companies have until December 28, 2020 to submit comments to the AG on the modifications.
Continue Reading The Button is Back! Fourth Set of Modifications to CCPA Regulations Released

By ballot initiative, California residents recently approved Proposition 24, or the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), with approximately 56 percent voting in favor. CPRA significantly amends the CCPA by expanding individual rights, introducing new GDPR-style governance measures, and establishing a new enforcement agency (among other things). Importantly, CPRA does not replace or repeal CCPA, but rather augments it.  Further, no new private right of action will be added by CPRA.  The substantive provisions of CPRA do not take effect until January 1, 2023.
Continue Reading The CCPA Wheels Keep Turning: The Addition of CPRA

The California Attorney General recently released a third set of proposed modifications to the CCPA regulations. As we previously covered, the CCPA regulations were approved and went into effect on August 14, 2020. Many companies will likely be frustrated by the fact that new changes have been proposed again, just two months after the final version was approved. Companies have until October 28, 2020 to submit comments to the AG on the modifications.
Continue Reading Will CCPA Regulation Change Again?: Comment Deadline Looming

Following lots of legislative uncertainty, Brazil has now formally enacted the country’s first general data protection law, Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados, or “LGPD.” While administrative sanctions do not go into effect until August 1, 2021, individuals and public prosecutors can now bring claims for losses and damages. Indeed, at least one public civil action has already been filed. LGPD is the first comprehensive general data protection law in Latin America. It was modeled after the EU’s GDPR. While there are many similarities, LGPD does introduce new concepts. Below are some of the key elements to keep in mind.
Continue Reading Brazil’s Comprehensive Privacy Law Now in Effect

Late this summer the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) announced its first enforcement action since the cybersecurity rules went into effect in March 2017. The action was brought against First American Title Insurance Co. as a result of a 2018 data breach exposing 850 million customer records containing sensitive personal information.
Continue Reading What the First Enforcement Action under NYDFS Cybersecurity Reg Means to Companies

An amendment to the CCPA recently passed through the legislature, adding some much needed clarity to HIPAA-regulated entities, research institutions and other life science and medical device companies. CCPA in its current form left open uncertainty for business associates, de-identified information, and information collected in the course of medical research. AB 713 helps clarify certain exemptions and applicability of CCPA to organizations in the health and research space.
Continue Reading CCPA Amendment Adds Needed Clarity for Medical & Research Community

As the California legislature session concluded at the end of August, a significant amendment to the CCPA finally passed both houses. California bill AB-1281 passed the Senate in the last days of the month, extending the business-to-business and employee/applicant carve-outs through January 1, 2022 (as we wrote about previously). The bill now sits with Governor Newsom to sign before the end of September.
Continue Reading CCPA Bill Extending Exemptions Passes Through California Legislature

The California AG has now released the final CCPA regulations, as approved by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL).  The final draft (issued August 14, 2020) incorporates some relatively minor changes that the OAG submitted as part of its final rulemaking package, as summarized in its addendum to the final statement of reasons. In addition to generally “non-substantive” edits for consistency, etc. the OAG withdrew four sections (999.305(a)(5), 999.306(b)(2), 999.315(c), and 999.326(c)) from OAL review.
Continue Reading CCPA Regulations Finally Approved, Effective Immediately