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Elfin Noce is an associate in the Business Trial Practice Group in the firm's Washington, D.C. office. He also is a member of the Privacy and Cybersecurity Team.

NIST’s new draft guidance, Special Publication 800-53B, Control Baselines for Information Systems and Organizations, provides important information on selecting both security and privacy control baselines for the Federal Government. These control baselines are from NIST Special Publication 800-53 and have been moved to this separate publication “so the SP 800-53 [can] serve as a consolidated catalog of security and privacy controls regardless of how those controls [are] used by different communities of interest.”   The new guidance addresses federal information systems and is applicable to information systems used or operated by an agency, a contractor on behalf of an agency, or another organization on behalf of an agency.
Continue Reading NIST Issues Draft Guidance on Security and Privacy Control Baselines – SP 800-53B

NIST recently released the final public draft of SP 800-172, Enhanced Security Requirements for Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information: A Supplement to NIST Special Publication 800-171 (formerly Draft NIST SP 800-171B). NIST is proposing additional security requirements for certain CUI in non-federal systems that is associated with critical programs or high value assets and is soliciting public comments through August 21, 2020.
Continue Reading NIST Proposes Draft Enhanced Security Requirements for Protecting CUI

As a part of its Cybersecurity for IoT Program, NIST recently released two publications with the goal of providing cybersecurity guidance and best practices specific for companies manufacturing IoT devices. These publications were developed as a part of NIST’s implementation of the 2017 Executive Order on Strengthening the Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure. With these publications, NIST provides a set of recommended activities that manufacturers should consider to improve the securability of IoT devices, as well as a baseline level of security requirements for these devices.

Continue Reading NIST Releases Cybersecurity Guidance for Manufacturers of IoT Devices

The European Parliament recently issued a resolution directed at the European Commission on its concerns with automated decision-making processes and artificial intelligence. While the EU Parliament addresses several areas of automated decision-making, the underlying theme of this resolution is that the Commission should ensure that there is transparency and human oversight of these processes. In particular, the EU Parliament stresses that consumers should be properly informed about how the automated decision-making functions, be protected from harm, and, particularly with automated decision-making in professional services, that humans are always responsible and able to overrule decisions.  Additionally, this resolution stresses the need for a risk-based approach to regulating AI and automated decision-making and for the availability of large amounts of high quality data, while at the same time protecting any personal data under GDPR.
Continue Reading European Parliament Weighs in on Automated Decision-Making

The FTC recently finalized settlements with five companies over allegations that they falsely claimed certification under the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework. In each complaint, the FTC alleged that DCR Workforce, Inc., Thru, Inc., LotaData, Inc., and 214 Technologies, Inc. made false and misleading representations when they stated that they participated under the Privacy Shield framework on their website when they were not participants under the framework. Additionally, in the complaint against EmpiriStat, Inc., the FTC alleged that EmpiriStat, Inc. made a false and misleading representations when it stated that it was a current participant under the Privacy Shield framework on its website after it had allowed its certification to lapse and had been warned by the U.S. Department of Commerce to take down its claim of participation.
Continue Reading FTC Finalizes Five Settlements Regarding Privacy Shield Claims

The Network Advertising Initiative, which provides guidance to advertisers who engage in personalized advertising, updated its Code of Conduct (2020 Code) earlier this year to address, inter alia, data collected offline and used for tailored advertising, as well as CCPA and TV-based tailored advertising. In anticipation of the January 1, 2020 effective date of the Code, the NAI recently issued a guidance on how to get “opt-in consent.” While the NAI Code and guidance is applicable only to NAI members, the requirements are important for all to know, since it is these members who typically implement companies’ online behavioral advertising.
Continue Reading NAI’s 2020 Code Effective January 1 Along with CCPA

The European Data Protection Board recently requested comments on its data protection “by design and default” guidelines. Comments are due by mid-January of next year. The Guidelines provide clarity about how to address GDPR’s requirement that companies take “appropriate” technical and organizational steps to protect personal information and individuals. Part of the law’s requirements, according to the guidelines, is that companies can show that the measures they took are effective.
Continue Reading New European Data Protection Board Guidance on Data Protection by Design and by Default

As we reported in our sister blog, “One ‘Chirp, Buzz, Or Blink’ Is Not Enough To Sue Under the TCPA”, a recent court decision makes it more difficult for plaintiffs to establish standing under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. In its decision, the Eleventh Circuit ruled that a single text message from an attorney to his former client did not amount to sufficient harm to sue in federal court. The Court concluded that the allegations regarding the single text message were not enough to state a concrete injury-in-fact necessary for federal jurisdiction. The Eleventh Circuit’s ruling appears to conflict with a previous Ninth Circuit decision regarding the same issue.
Continue Reading A Single Text Message May Not Violate TCPA

One of the amendments we’ve been watching over the past months is one that impacts rights of employees —both the company’s and other company’s employees. Under AB25, which passed the California Senate and is now awaiting governor signature, companies will be (for a year) exempted from providing current and former employees, job applicants, and contractors with the full suite of CCPA rights. Starting January 2020, however, these individuals must be provided with notice of information use. Access and deletion rights will not go into effect until January 2021.
Continue Reading What To Do About Employees Under CCPA: An Update