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Charles Glover is an associate in the Intellectual Property Practice Group in the firm's New York office.

The New York State Attorney General’s finding that EyeMed Vision Care LLC had failed to protect customer data in violation of the NY SHIELD Act provides insights for companies on how to protect information. New York’s SHIELD Act applies, as we have written previously, to any organization owning or licensing the information of a NYS resident, not just organizations located in New York. It requires companies to take reasonable administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to protect collected personal information.
Continue Reading Keeping Both Eyes on Cybersecurity

Baltimore recently prohibited several uses of “face surveillance” technology.  Under the new law companies cannot use systems that identify or verify individuals based on their face.  The law also prohibits saving information gathered from these systems.  Getting an individual’s consent is not a way around the prohibition. Nor is promising not to connect information gathered with other personal information.

Continue Reading Baltimore Blows By Brother Burghs with Big Biometrics Ban

The FTC recently voted to authorize the use of compulsory processes—the FTC’s primary investigatory tools—on what it calls “key law enforcement priorities.” The resolutions allow investigators to take actions like issuing subpoenas and civil investigations demands (commonly referred to as “CIDs”) in a variety of areas. Of note is the inclusion of both healthcare markets and technology platforms, signaling a potential FTC interest in those sectors.

Continue Reading FTC Signals Focus on Healthcare and Technology Platforms, Among Others